Cost Calculations for Sublevel Long-Hole Stoping

Pugh, Gordon M. ; Rasmussen, David G.
Organization: Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration
Pages: 6
Publication Date: Jan 1, 1982
INTRODUCTION Sublevel long-hole stoping is a large tonnage stoping method that may be used when there is a fairly com¬petent straight vein and the walls will stand with little support. It is a method that lends itself to a high degree of mechanization. Two variations of the method are illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. Fig. 1 illustrates development typical for a 3-m (10-ft) wide vein. Initial development is by a lower haulageway, which may be either track or trackless. A two-compartment raise is driven in the footwall of the vein. At about 12 m (40 ft) above the main head¬ing, a footwall scram is driven and pockets through the vein are cut on 7.6-m (25-ft) centers. Each of the sub¬level blocks selected in this example is 45.7 m (150 ft) long by 12 m (40 ft) high. Stoping starts at the slot raises at stope endlines and retreats to the timbered raise. This retreat sequence starts on the lowest sublevel and the opening cut is blasted into the slot raise. This retreating system is used in order to provide a good safe back over the miners working in any given sublevel. A crawler-mounted down-the-hole or conventional pneumatic drill puts the holes down from one sublevel to the next on any desired drill pattern. Gravity flow brings the broken ore down to the scram level. The illustration shows a large slusher mounted at the timbered raise and slushing from the pockets back to the raise chute. Development of the ore block in Fig. 2 is typical for a 5.5-m (18-ft) wide vein. Initial development is by a trackless heading driven in the footwall of the vein. Pockets are then put into and through the vein on 7.6-m (25-ft) centers. For ease in using trackless rubber tired mucking equipment, these pockets are crosscut to the vein at approximately 1.04 rad (60°) rather than per¬pendicular. A two-compartment timbered raise is driven down from one level to the next. Endline slot raises are again put through from level to level. Each of the sub¬level blocks selected in this example is 40-m (130 ft) long by 33.5 m (110 ft) high. Stoping starts at the slot raises and retreats back to the timbered raise. Long holes are drilled from one sub¬level down to the next by starting between the lowest pair of sublevels and then working up the ore block. Mucking out of the pocket drawpoints is accomplished by rubber-tired load-haul-dump (LHD) units which then dump into a centrally located orepass.
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