The Matakan Unit in the Lelet Limestone, A New Ireland Coal and Associated Carbonaceous Sediments: Hydrocarbon Generation from Pollen Exines at Low Maturation

Organization: The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
Pages: 4
Publication Date: Jan 1, 1987
The Matakan Unit of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea is a highly fossiliferous lagoonal deposit containing numerous coal pods and lenses. The unit is strati graphically part of the massive reefal Lelet Limestone of Miocence age. These organic-rich sediments have a high hydrocarbon potential as evident from microscopical observations as well as Rock- Eval pyrolysis data. The coal is varied in regard to dominant macerals, vitrinite being predominant in some parts and pollen and spores present in sufficient proportions to constitute a cannel coal elsewhere. The highly fossiliferous carbo as Rock-Eval pyrolysis data. The coal is varied in regard to dominant macerals, vitrinite being predominant in some parts and pollen and spores present in sufficient proportions to constitute a cannel coal elsewhere. The highly fossiliferous carbonaceous sedimentary rocks associated with the coal are rich in pyrite expressed in the sulphur content (19.7 - 22.8%). A high primary productivity and anoxic sediment pore waters or just above sediment - water interface have given rise to sufficient organic matter accumulations to yield a potential hydrocarbon source rock. Atomic H/C ratios of the coals are between kerogen type III and type II mainly, expressing the mixed nature of the coal and that of the associated sediments is type II. Early generated hydrocarbons (exsudatinite) have formed from pollen exines filling the pollen cavities and in places filling micro- fissures in the surrounding vitrinite.
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