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Document Summary

for "Offshore Shaft Construction In The North Sea"


Title
Offshore Shaft Construction In The North Sea
Author Adamson, J. N. 
Society / Organization SME 
Summary / Abstract The Alcan Smelter project at Lynemouth on the Northumbrian coast draws cooling water for the power station through shafts and tunnels from the North Sea. The sea at this part of the coast is frequently very rough and even in calm weather the coastal currents are strong. The adjacent coal mine makes use of these currents to disperse colliery waste and discharges into the sea some thirty thousand tons each week. In consequence the sea bed is continuously shifting and the sea is black and turbid. Construction of sea shafts under these conditions presents difficulties as drilling from a floating vessel is hazardous and sea bed activity of divers is greatly hindered by the entire absence of visibility. After considering several alternatives a method of construction was agreed with the Consultants in which the drilling and also the lining of the shaft would be completed in sequence from an eight legged work barge (GEM 126). Each shaft would be drilled to full depth and a steel cylinder, with its ends closed temporarily, would be lowered into the hole and grouted into the formation to form a full-length permanent lining. The bell mouth for each shaft would be constructed in advance to form part of the cylindrical casing. On interception of the shaft by its appropriate tunnel the lower end of the cylindrical casing would be cut away and the internal walling of the shaft installed from below. After completion of construction the shafts and tunnels would be flooded and the bell mouth sealing covers removed by divers. 
Format PDF 
File Size 588.1k 
Specifications v 7.0 / 300 dpi 
Copyright Date 1/1/97 
Publication Date 1/1/97 
Digitization Date 4/28/08 
Book Title Rapid Excavation and Tunneling Conference Proceedings – 1972 
Chapter Chapter 51 - Pioneer Mining Projects 
Pages 15 

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